Our Current Civil War

On July 20th The Signal published a column by Joshua Heath entitled “A Democrat’s defense of the GOP” (Link), in which he described what he perceived as the beneficial effects of the essentially two-party system of our political structure in this country.

The problem with his thesis is that the traditional Democrat Party he described is virtually non-existent today, having been hijacked by far-left extremists who seem to be obsessed with destroying our social order and cultural norms.

He has effectively described the political order that existed when I was his age. That was a very long time ago. In my opinion this country is currently engaged in a civil war every bit as intense and fundamental as the one that took place in the 1860s, the only difference being that thankfully much less blood has been shed… so far.

The transformation of the Democrat Party into what it’s become today began with the radical left of the 1960s, with the Vietnam War and race relations being the pivotal issues of the time.

If there’s a watershed event, it’s the 1968 Democrat convention in Chicago. I encourage everyone to research that event. There had already been riots over race relations, but they’d been primarily carried out by minorities. The lesson for the radical left that the Democrat convention debacle illustrated was that mainstream Middle American whites could also riot, and that the rioting could have a profound influence on the policy decisions of that party.

LBJ withdrew from the election; the Dems nominated his VEEP Humphrey, and Nixon was elected in a solid repudiation of LBJ’s policies on the Vietnam War.

And so the fuse was lit.

Over time, the left and right drove further apart, and rioting and other forms of bad behavior became a standard tool of the left. And one has to be honest and acknowledge that you just don’t see equivalent behavior of that scale from the right.

Further, the prevailing ideology of the left also moved steadily further toward radicalism, with formerly “mainstream” liberalism being more and more marginalized. There’s a cliché that in today’s political climate, Democrat icon JFK would actually be a Republican, and frankly, it’s true. That alone symbolizes the changes that have taken place to the Dem party.

The reality is that Washington’s political landscape, particularly in the Democrat party, has been warped and distorted by the rise to prominence of the radical left in that party.

This country is incredibly polarized. In my opinion, as I said earlier, his view is reflective of a political landscape that existed decades ago, not today.

 

©Brian Baker 2017

 

(Published 21 July 2017 on my blog and in The Signal)

 

 

 

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16 comments on “Our Current Civil War

  1. Hardnox says:

    Succinctly written Brian. The problem is that the asshats that led the riots in the ’60s are running the Dim party. What is sorely lacking are water cannons and wood shampoos.

    Mr. Heath hasn’t realized that this ain’t his grandfather’s Democrat party. They are full blown Leftists. Further, there are no liberals either.

    • BrianR says:

      Thanks, Nox. I absolutely agree. Those rioters are now the people running political parties, schools and universities, newspapers, etc.

      Traditional “liberals” are about as rare as hens’ teeth.

  2. Kathy says:

    Lots of innocent people, including nearby residents were attacked in the 1968 Chicago nightmare, and what we’re seeing today is very similar. About the only difference I see is that the riots in 68 were prior to the election, where most of them now have been afterward.

    The rioters today are coming armed with Molotov cocktails, rocks, brass knuckles, etc. and pursuing conservative events and pro-Trump rallies, yet during all these months of riots, not one Democrat leader has called for a cease to the fighting, instead, they continue to fund the bad behavior. The Dems have moved so far left of what they were in the 60s, that they’re only about one step away from communism.

    • BrianR says:

      Perfect summarization, Kathy. I couldn’t agree more. But the riots aren’t only post-election; they’re all the time. Remember those “Occupy” fools?

  3. captbogus2 says:

    I remember the old days when my family was half and half Democrat and GOP and the arguments they’d get into. When Eisenhower beat Stevenson my father sent a telegram to my aunt, “Congratulations on your choice. Am getting an apple cart.” To which my aunt wired back, “Can recommend jack ass to pull your cart. Will be available January 20.” And then they were back to normal….until 1956…. But folks ain’t that way now…

    • BrianR says:

      Nope, they’re sure not. That’s the era the kid Joshua wrote about, except he thinks we’re still living there.

  4. garnet92 says:

    You covered it nicely, Brian. The recipe for a democrat is nothing like what made a democrat back then. The ingredients have changed and they’ve become a contaminated and foul concoction, similar to the old party in name only.

    There was a time when democrats and Republicans could talk and hash things out without excessive rancor. But now, they’re convinced that anyone who is not a “progressive” shouldn’t participate in government at all.

    Even their protesting is no longer peaceful, it’s become the work of masked and armed thugs, prepared to shout down, disrupt, blockade and riot to get their poisonous points made – and what’s worse is that they’re being trained as “social justice warriors” in our colleges now. What will the democrats be like when that generation takes over?

    They’re going downhill and I don’t see anything to slow their rapid descent into oblivion – the question is, will they take us with them?

    • BrianR says:

      Thanks, Garnet.

      Yes, that is the question, isn’t it? Can the problem be fixed, or are we going to end up repeating the experience of the 1860s, or something equally as terrible?

  5. Terry says:

    A big factor in the difference between the hippie protesters of the ’60s and the well organized, trained, armed and paid faux protesters of today, is George Soros’ billions.

    • BrianR says:

      That’s true, but he’s just a natural extension of the phenomenon. One more symptom of how cancerous the left has become.

  6. Grey Neely says:

    “The reality is that Washington’s political landscape, particularly in the Democrat party, has been warped and distorted by the rise to prominence of the radical left in that party.”

    That statement is so very true Brian. And the standard politicians in both parties are going along with this (as long as it benefits their back pockets).

    I just wonder when the actual shooting will start. Perhaps the Radical Left will be smart enough to stay in the large cities and out of range of Rural America.

  7. CW says:

    There is always an element of American society that, although they’ll rarely come right out and admit it, detest the Constitution and the way that it protects the rights of their fellow citizens. This is the radical Left. Although they’re always present, they generally lay low in the universities, newspapers, the ACLU and various organizations until they smell opportunity. At these times they instigate protests and riots, testing the waters to see if the appetite and strength is there for the takeover they hunger for.

    The followers of the radical Left are stupid sheep, but the leaders among them aren’t dumb by any means. They know very well the conditions that lead to opportunity for them. Those conditions are (1) complacency and (2) unhappiness. Long ago they learned that if they can help create these conditions, they could craft more opportunities for themselves. To keep people complacent they hide their true motives behind their own dictionary of nice-sounding terms like increasing “revenue,” instead of increasing “taxes,” or “undocumented” vs. “illegal.” And they foment unhappiness (with the invaluable assistance of the MSM) by focusing the public’s attention on things that annoy or anger them. My dad, one of the most politically astute men I’ve known, said that the downfall of Richard Nixon was the economic conditions, specifically the gasoline crisis, wherein people found themselves waiting in long lines at the gas pump while simultaneously listening to the news of the Watergate hearings on their radios. That’s unhappiness.

    You said, “There’s a cliché that in today’s political climate, Democrat icon JFK would actually be a Republican…”

    So what distinguished JFK from the Republicans of his day? What made him a Democrat then, but a Republican now? What I’m suggesting is that the baseline is always moving on both sides. As the Democrats move farther left, so do many Republicans, unfortunately. Just look at what’s happened with the current attempt to repeal Obamacare, when only eight short years ago every Republican voted against it. It may appear that we beat the radical Left insurgency back from time to time, but incrementalism gives them victories that too many don’t recognize until it’s too late.

    • BrianR says:

      Terrific synopsis, CW, and a column in its own right. Thank you.

      You wrote: “So what distinguished JFK from the Republicans of his day? What made him a Democrat then, but a Republican now? What I’m suggesting is that the baseline is always moving on both sides. As the Democrats move farther left, so do many Republicans, unfortunately.”

      Yes, EXACTLY. That’s the full import of that observation, and why at this point the radical left seems to be winning the war. The standard is moving left as the GOP continues to waffle and cave. There hasn’t been a decent GOP presidential candidate since Reagan. I think one of the important positives of Trump’s win is that he’s created all this turmoil that has the potential of shaking the feckless GOP out of their torpor. Maybe inject them with some spine.

      We’ll see…

      • CW says:

        “….the important positives of Trump’s win is that he’s created all this turmoil that has the potential of shaking the feckless GOP out of their torpor. Maybe inject them with some spine.”

        But which faction of the GOP will Trump inject with spine? That’s the critical question, because the GOP, as you know better than anyone, is a house divided. It’s a mess. My concern all along was that Trump would provide the kind of leadership that would strengthen the RINO element of the GOP, at least with respect to fiscal policy. That concern was validated when he sided with the Paul Ryan Club and attacked the Freedom Caucus when Obamacare-lite was on the table in the House. It’ll be great if Trump unites people on stopping illegal immigration and bringing jobs back and defeating terrorists, but the fact is we need ALL elements of conservatism to save the Republic.

      • BrianR says:

        “But which faction of the GOP will Trump inject with spine?”

        Yup, that is the big question, isn’t it?

        You and I have been writing columns about this for years, going all the way back to the old TH days. That’s at least a decade. I’ve been quite clear about the fact that I think that this country may be well on its way to duplicating the fall of the Western Roman Empire. I am NOT sanguine at all. We may already be toast.

        Hell, I’m the guy who coined the “PSP” acronym for the GOP. And frankly I don’t think much has changed.

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